Saturday, March 7, 2009

Vitamin Might Help Boost Neutrophil Counts

Anybody seen this one? This is an interesting idea. I tried reading the abstract of the paper itself and I must say I would not have drawn this conclusion, but I didn't read the full paper, so...

Niacinamide is a form of vitamin B3, and is generally found to be safe even in relatively high doses. Caution is called for, though. It's a good idea to check with the doc regarding the use of this or any other supplement. Also, the increase in counts is temporary (darn!). It may help us be safer from infections, though.

I hope there are more studies in this area. Neutropenia is a serious problem that (obviously) can kill.

The doses cited in the paper work out to between 750-1500 mg for a 165 pound man. The RDA is only 16 mg, so this qualifies as more medicine than supplementation. Also, niacin, the other common form of vitamin B3, has been linked to the growth of new blood vessels in the tumor. Tumors can't grow past a certain point without vascular support. This is true even in CLL, since lymph nodes need new blood vessels to grow, and increase microvascularization in the marrow has been linke to CLL progression.

Any comments?

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Vitamin B3 Fuels Neutrophil Production 2/23/2009

As the first line of defense against invading microbes, neutrophils
are the “foot soldiers” of the innate immune system. Upon release
from the bone marrow, neutrophils circulate in the blood for only a
few hours before homing to peripheral tissues where they survive at
most for 2 or 3 days. To keep up with the heavy demand for these
short-lived cells, a normal healthy adult produces approximately 10 to the 11th power
neutrophils each day and up to 10 times that number in the setting of
acute infection.

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy often experience disruptions
in neutrophil homeostasis, which places them at increased risk for
infection. The ability to boost neutrophil production with
recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has
revolutionized care for patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile (fever)
neutropenia. However, the molecular mechanism by which G-CSF induces
myeloid differentiation remains poorly understood.

A team of researchers at Hannover Medical School in Germany recently
reported a major breakthrough in neutrophil development that may have
important clinical implications. Upon binding to its receptor on the
surface of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF turns on an enzyme that
converts intracellular vitamin B3 (nicotinamide) into an activate
metabolite (nicotinamide monocleotide). The researchers found that
this is the rate-limiting step in a signal transduction pathway that
triggers granulopoiesis.

Addition of vitamin B3 or its precursor induced granulocyte
differentiation of cultured hematopoietic stem cells. Administration
of high doses (10-20mg/kg/day) of vitamin B3 to six healthy
individuals resulted in significant increases in neutrophil count over
a 7 day period and a return to physiological cell counts when vitamin
B3 was withdrawn.

These findings identify a new role for vitamin B3 in granulopoiesis
and beg for clinical trials to evaluate the use of vitamin B3 either
alone or in combination with G-CSF for the treatment of neutropenia.

Source

Skokowa J, Lan D, Thakur BK, et al. NAMPT is essential for the
G-CSF-induced myeloid differentiation via a NAD+-sirtuin-1-dependent
pathway. Nat Med. 2009;15(2):151-158.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://www.morethanalive.com/Astragalus-Root-Cut

Check out Astragalus Root. I have Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia and just started taking Astragalus Root, hoping it helps with neutrophil count. It is non-toxic at any dose, but of course check with your doctor before using.

Amy King said...

I have Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia too. Have you found any answers? Did this help? They are doing a study at the NIH on people with CIN that your doctor may recommend. I think you have to have a referral to do it.

Amy King said...

I have Chronic Idiopathic Neutropenia too. Have you found any answers? Did this help? They are doing a study at the NIH on people with CIN that your doctor may recommend. I think you have to have a referral to do it.